Does Bust Size Affect Breast Milk?

Updated: Jul 30


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It's normal to have concerns about your breast size and shape, especially if you are an expecting or a first-time mother. Women with small breasts might worry they will be unable to produce enough milk for their babies. This worry is unwarranted! The size of your breasts is determined by the amount of fatty tissue; smaller breasts have less fatty tissue, while larger breasts have more fatty tissue. Fatty tissue is not involved in the production of breast milk, rather, it is the glandular tissue called lobules that produces breast milk.

When your baby suckles, hormones are released which signals the lobules to begin producing milk and for the muscles in the lobules to contract, squeezing milk out through the milk ducts and out the nipples. Your breast milk supply depends on how much and often your baby feeds. The more milk your baby feeds, the more milk your body will make. Each time your baby feeds, your body knows to make more milk for the next feeding. The amount of milk you make will go up or down depending on how often your baby feeds.


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Women with different breast sizes are fully capable of producing a healthy supply of breast milk for their babies. Most pregnant women will experience an increase in their bust size due to hormonal changes in preparation for producing milk. However, not everyone experiences these changes. A lack of breast growth is not an indication of the health of the pregnancy or a woman's ability to produce milk or breastfeed their baby.


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